• Member Since 4th Jan, 2016
  • offline last seen 3 hours ago

Time Reaper


Greetings from Venezuela, I don't expect to do much here, I just got a few stories in my head and wanted write them here, I hope you like them. I take Commissions and can get Ko-Fi donations.

Latest Stories
12

Blog Posts
157

May
7th
2019

Commission rates, Translation rates and Ko-Fi Donations · 12:40am May 7th, 2019

Price System

- The initial charge will be of 1 dollar for every 100 words for any story, that way, a 1000 words story would cost 10 USD but, should things get more complex, the final price can be negotiated but, at least, 50% of the payment must be given upfront if you are a first time customer and I won't write content that makes me uncomfortable. Beyond this the system will go through the following:

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Comments ( 132 )
  • Viewing 113 - 132 of 132

2957561

Oh yeah, Latin America is a beautiful continent, each country has its own vibe and culture. I hope you get to enjoy your next visit.

2957361
Thanks, I shall join.

2957356
Just peachy... just watching my country tear itself apart, lol... its been crazy to say the least. Just been praying and hoping the Supreme Court decides on the election like back in 2000.

Hope you're staying safe in Venezuela.
Always wanted to visit. The only South American country I've been to was Peru.

2957345

If you're interested, I'm admin on this political group where we're allowed to share our political opinions as long as they don't break site rules (like don't be a jerk)

2957345

Well, I've been watching the disaster from down here and I'm not really sure what to expect. On one hand, if it's true the Democrats committed fraud, then that's a big blow for the democratic process in the US but if Biden's victory is legit, then the next US president is someone who will be sided with Maduro (I'm from Venezuela) and his allies (China) so I'm not really sure how to feel right now.

All I hope is that everything goes fine.

And how are you?

2957345

Well, I've been watching the disaster from down here and I'm not really sure what to expect. On one hand, if it's true the Democrats committed fraud, then that's a big blow for the democratic process in the US but if Biden's victory is legit, then the next US president is someone who will be sided with Maduro (I'm from Venezuela) and his allies (China) so I'm not really sure how to feel right now.

All I hope is that everything goes fine.

And how are you?

How have you been?

2955998
So glad you liked it, I never would have thought Tim Pool had a signing voice like that

2955808

THat was a nice video, thanks.

I just found this, and thought you may like it

2949311
Nice, will give it a read.

2949251

Best wishes, if you want an idea of what kind of stories I write, you can check my first horror story here. I try to focus on stories based on Latin American horror stories (particularly Venezuela)

2949216
2020 in a nutshell... I live in California... been watching my state burn... like it usually does... lol.

2949205

I won't complain, I'm still alive, but having difficulties to focus on writing. I have planned a Halloween story but I have problems sitting in front of the laptop and write the story itself.

It's been my problem for 2020 so far: concentration.

How have you been?

2869567

Hopefully, the situation in Venezuela resolves peacefully.

That's what I wish, same with many on this crisis.

One of the things that I never understood about Chavez was his position and the reason to have a belligerent politic against the neo-liberal nations, I remember the crisis of 2008, where the Andean nations almost went to a full-scale war just because Chavez seemed to look for a reason to declare war on us and try to lure the United States.

Oh yeah, that was probably his ego, wanting to show around who was the one in control. He liked to do that a lot in here (if anyone criticized him or made him look bad, Chávez would respond by using anything under his control to make that person suffer) and he also liked to do that across the world. Just look at how he talked about Bush and Spain, since Uribe wasn't one to let Chávez do whatever he want, Chávez took big hatred on him (that, and becuase Uribe was a pain for the FARC and those who followed the same ideology)

There is also the accusation saying that Venezuela has helped the guerilla and narco groups since the 80s.

Hum... I know Chávez did, but I don't remember the governments, before Chávez, doing it. Well, I don't remember them helping the FARC or Left Wing guerillas or narco groups, so I would have to check that out just as much and see if the Cartel De Los Soles (a narco group formed within the Venezuelan military that existed BEFORE Chávez, although Diosdado Cabello took over it now) was involved in helping the narcos in Colombia.

I was talking with a guy that supports the 'izquierda' in Colombia being liberated by Petro, and he told me some things that at first glance just seemed irrational but they still left me thinking about them. He said that the only reason for the current situation of Venezuela is thanks to an 'economic belt' imposed by the United States and Colombia, and the most irrational part of it was that he said that Chavez was an actual liberator of the Venezuelan people and Maduro has been a great leader who has actually sent the economy of Venezuela to the skies, and the news showing the massive inflation of Venezuela are just American propaganda. He also loves the Chinese and says that they are going to destroy the American economy, I mean, I know that the majority of those things are b******t. I once met a refugee here in Bogotá, and he said to me the whole thing of how socialism destroyed Venezuela, but I wanted to know the opinion coming from someone who lives there, what is the general feeling about this.

Alright, as someone who became fully involved in politics when the opposition won the legislative elections of December of 2015, and was born in 1993, I will say my memories of how Chávez and Maduro ruled:

When he came to power, he started to make hours long cadenas on which he would mostly talk about people he disliked and how he fired people, among other things. I didn't realized when he changed the Constitution in 1999 but, after reading it, he basically made a lot of articles vague to allow him as much control as possible (including the elimination of the Senate, the one institution focused on putting a block on the president and ensure that the power remains under control)

I remember him leaving in April 11th of 2002 (he was deeply unpopular due to firing the over 11.000 workers in PDVSA just to put over 100.000 of people loyal to him and knew nothing of oil production, among other things) and when he came back, how he started to send journalist, judges, military, etc. to jail while suppressing any kind of protest that went against him (the only protest that got as big as the protest of 2002 were the ones in 2017, just to give you a idea of how big they were) while acting as if they were all terrorist that didn't deserve to protest, even though they were peaceful. BTW, both Bush and Pastrana recognized the "president" that lasted only a day, Carmona Estanga, which is why Chávez hated so much the two of them.

I remember when the the first recall referendum (el Revocatorio) of 2004 came and he won (even though many doubt that) and, followed that, he started to fire all the people in the government that voted against him (for more reference: search for "La Lista Tascón") and, even if unrelated, I remember how my grandma (who worked for the Sports Institution) always had her pension delayed (or wasn't even paid) after that referendum was held.

I remember how in 2007 the channel RCTV was closed after Chávez made the law to control our media (la Ley RESORTE) because the current law forced ALL TV channels to put government propaganda and RCTV refused to put it and he celebrated it because RCTV was among his most fervent critics and how RCTV didn't how the events of April 11th the way Chávez wanted (I think RCTV didn't show it at all).

When Chávez lost the Constitutional Referendum of 2007 (which would allow him to turn us into Cuba) he called that "una victoria de mierda" and there are videos on Youtube showing him saying that. Still, since he had a congress 100% chavista, he used the legislative to legalized EVERYTHING he wanted to implement on that constitution he failed to win.

In 2009 he started to exile or send to jail all the people he hated (or, at least, the ones who were the biggest headache at the time) like the General Raúl Isaías Baduel (in 2007, Chávez called him "Judas" for going against him) and he made a new referendum to win the indefinite reelection. Meanwhile, we had our first scarcity of powdered milk, among other things. During all these years, Chávez nationalized (even though that word is too kind, since a nationalization implies a payment, the "expropiaciones" were a forced takeover with no payment) a lot of industries, like water, electricity, the seeds for our agriculture, the internet (partially, we still have some private ISP and phone lines), our healthcare system, our schools and anything he touched became garbage. He also put control over our dollar exchange so he could stop the "fuga de capitales" which were people taking their money out because Chávez wanted to take it, either through big taxes or through demands, etc.

None of this taking into account the inflation that was always been above 10% yearly or how the farmers had a harder time to work since Chávez forced took control of the prices they could sell their goods,

In 2012 He made the presidential elections in the middle of the year, despite the Constitution saying that it had to be in December, and used his total control of the Judiciary, Electoral group, Contraloría, even the legislative (which had some opposition by this point, but it still was over 3/5 chavista, to make Capriles' campaign as hard as possible, while he had a cancer that he refused to acknowledge until much later in the campaign.

I even remember when he reworked our cops and increase the gun control just to, in exchange, the crime rates starting to increase more and more, to the point that it became dangerous to leave at all.

Then Maduro came, the inflation became even higher, the firings increased, the guns were completely banned, the internet went slower to the point that using CANTV can only provide you internet if you pay a worker to give you internet in exchange of over 200 dollars, the water started to become scarce, same with the electricity and food.

The price controls made everything harder to get because nobody wants to make food at a loss (this wasn't a subsidy, people was being forced to price goods at a lower price of what they were actually worth) and even the medicines became harder to get.

My mom had to leave to the US (temporarily) in order to get a bank account that could get us dollars because, otherwise, you wouldn't survive in here. The only way to survive in here is by either abide to Maduro and get a monthly food box (CLAP) or to get dollars in the black market (because it's impossible to get them legally, unless you work very high in Maduro's government) or because you have a family member in the outside world sending you.

This is just the short version of how it is to live in here and how has everything gone from bad to worse. This isn't even talking about how Chávez submitted our military to the Cuban espionage service (el G2) or how he made us a Cuban puppet (Maduro would later make us a Chinese/Russian puppet as well) or how our debt has increased like crazy.

Chávez and Maduro never liberated us, it was the opposite and the US had nothing to do with this crisis, in fact, our food/water/electricity crisis started at least in 2013 and the first US sanction came in January of 2017 (and that was a personal one, directed at one individual, the economic embargo was last year against our oil industry) so the US had nothing to with what happened here, it was all just Chávez, Maduro and their socialist/communist agenda. Yes, communist, we have most, if not all, of Marx's steps into the Communist state.

If you want, you can feel free to ask about specific cases, I'll try to be as detailed as I can.

2869122

Looking at the whole coronavirus issue and the US-Venezuelan relations I was wondering, do Venezuelan people really see Maduro as a dictator, or the majority see them as a president

A vast majority of Venezuelans look at him as a dictator, only chavistas (and a certain group of socialist that likes to call themselves opposition but their policies are too similar to Chavez's) keep seeing Maduro as a legitimate president (although they are a minority) while I've met chavistas themselves who really don't like Maduro.

and another thing is the issue of an interventionist action in Venezuela, I mean, here everybody is against it because we usually see Venezuela as our separated brothers, but does Venezuela really needs an intervention?

That's a tricky one. Here, Maduro (and all the chavista regime) is deeply afraid of losing their grip on power, so they do whatever they can to keep their control. Adding their control (through money, threats and counter espionage) of the military, making it subservient of them, they've managed to do whatever they want within Venezuela. The thing is that the International Community (with the help of the opposition since they gained the Congress in the elections of December 2015) has managed to reduce the amount of money Maduro could steal from us (and I will clarify that medicines and food aren't part of the sanctions) in order to peacefully pressure him, and his cronies, into leaving Venezuela.

The main issue is that, as long as Maduro is in control, he won't leave. He doesn't care of anything as long as he is in control. Which is why the option of a military intervention has always been open to the US, even if they don't plan to do it on the short or even medium term.

In fact, this reward move may be the last attempt to remove him peacefully (hoping that the military will finally follow the Constitution and remove him) but, otherwise, even if we don't like the idea of being military invaded, if it's the only option then a military intervention has to be done. I've met many Venezuelans who wants this peacefully who don't care any longer about what could happen if we are invaded, all they want is Maduro out.

Thanks for asking, feel free to ask more questions.

  • Viewing 113 - 132 of 132
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