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For four pony visitors to Earth, practically everything is new and overwhelming, including food: not only in the wide variety of foods available for delivery, but how do you eat them with hooves?

Things in bowls are easy to figure out, but how should a pizza be approached? Is it, in fact, a flat breadbowl, a combination of soup and fondue held in by the crust?


Coming 6-27-22 a reading from StraightToThePointStudio!

Chapters (1)
Comments ( 160 )

Silly ponies! How I LARF at your misunderstandings!!

I see you skillfully avoided the Great Question with regards to Pineapple. :D

Haruna didn’t bother to explain how the chopsticks were meant to work. The ponies simply ate out of the styrofoam cartons.

Mini-feedbags. :raritywink:

Posh #4 · 2 weeks ago · · ·

God, this is so relatable. I don’t understand pizza either. One time I went to pizza hut, entered a fugue state, and emerged from it covered in Windex and surrounded by Yakuza strongmen. Nobody slept well that night.

11276532

Silly ponies! How I LARF at your misunderstandings!!

To be fair, a non-zero amount of people don’t eat the edge of the crust, since it’s toppingless. The obvious next step is to avoid any of the crust.

The ponies are living in the year 3000.

11276536

I see you skillfully avoided the Great Question with regards to Pineapple. :D

I did consider it.

Given that any pony pizza sold in Equestria would include toppings like carrots and hay . . .

Fact is, pizza is a vessel, just like a slice of bread. You can put whatever you want on it, and nobody can stop you.

11276537

Mini-feedbags. :raritywink:

Exactly! Food’s meant to be eaten out of things, whether it be a disposable styrofoam feedbag or a ‘bread bowl.’

11276552

God, this is so relatable. I don’t understand pizza either. One time I went to pizza hut, entered a fugue state, and emerged from it covered in Windex and surrounded by Yakuza strongmen.

That happens more than you’d think at Pizza Hut. You can’t out-pizza the Hut.

Nobody slept well that night.

:rainbowlaugh:

This was simultaneously funny and adorable.

Another masterpiece by the Admiral.

Perfect Pizza Parable.

Wait a minute did Silver Glow ever have pizza when she went over? Then again this is probably before her book has been published. Silly ponies experiencing all the fun human collage stuff,

i can only imagine what eating Pizza the first time as a pony would be like.

The number of choices were overwhelming. They finally settled on China Spring, since Penny not only knew what egg rolls were, but liked them. Her hometown had a Chinese restaurant with a cook who had been trained in San Francisco which was where Chinese food had been invented.

:rainbowlaugh:

It was two full months before they learned how they were actually supposed to eat a pizza.

:rainbowlaugh:

11276536
From what I've read online, sausage is the most popular topping, pineapple the least. Although, people joke about anchovies on pizza & I've never been anywhere that even offered them.

Hilarious and adorable as usual! :twilightsmile:

Helpful nerdy video on why certain means of eating pizza work.

Emil #19 · 2 weeks ago · · ·

The number of choices were overwhelming. They finally settled on China Spring, since Penny not only knew what egg rolls were, but liked them. Her hometown had a Chinese restaurant with a cook who had been trained in San Francisco which was where Chinese food had been invented.

It makes me wonder what else was in So You Want To Go To Earth.

Her hometown had a Chinese restaurant with a cook who had been trained in San Francisco which was where Chinese food had been invented.

You know, that may not be all that much of an exaggeration. I have heard tale that a lot of foods Americans associate with Chinese restaurants and thereby the Chinese actually had, in reality, originated in America and thereby are technically American inventions (I couldn't give you exact examples off hand though).

It's not just the Chinese though--this is true of a lot of foods that are seen as foreign. Take spaghetti and meatballs, a dish typically seen as Italian...but was almost certainly first invented in New York City. :rainbowlaugh:

And it's a phenomenon that happens in the rest of the world too, not just America. Y'all should take the time to look up what some other countries think constitute as "American" food that they've otherwise wholly invented themselves.

It occurs to me now that the same thing would probably happen with Equestria some day in this universe, so maybe that's a future premise for a story for ya there, Admiral Biscuit--a group of ponies laughing over some of the bizarre foods the humans have at some point invented but are trying to pass off as "traditional Equestrian food." :raritywink:

Fun little story!

11276559

You can put whatever you want on it

Haggis. Actually really good.
Chicken Tikka Masala. Also very good.
Swedish fish. (Yeah, the sorta gummy candy ones.) Not as horrible as you might think.
Spinach. Why?
California Roll. Not bad. Would be better if you could make the roll bits half-sized.
Refried beans. No bueno.
Spaghetti. Tastes like a brawl in an Italian restaurant.
Alligator tail. A little odd texture-wise, but very tasty.

11276629

Most of what the UK thinks of as Indian food, particularly curry, came from Glasgow.

11276716
Because spinach on pizza is tasty! Nothing like a stuffed-crust pizza with pepperoni, spinach, and pineapple.

Pizza. the Trencher Bread that stops you having to get Medaevil with it? :trixieshiftright:

Used to have a bolt on foot operated door wedge laying around. Add a string to that for opening the handle and you have a winner? Add a toe plate for dragging the door open with non hands?

In canon theres that Mobdaughter who stuck pencils to her forelocks with elastic bands? Pokefingers? :moustache:

Delightfully short, simple, and well written

Sequel when? Can't say Florida without cars, hurricanes, and...people from new jersey.

11276732
Make sense, actually, considering how much influence the Brits had in India back in their imperial days. Lots of cultural sharing happening both ways, and that would of course include food.

11276716
11276783
I once had artichoke on a peanut-butter-based sauce. It was surprisingly good.

I'm sort of on the ponies' side, here. Toppings on pizza are like the icing on a cake, or the filling in a cookie. Meant to be eaten with their container, but perfectly fine without them.:pinkiehappy:

Also, I don't think that I've ever before seen a correlation drawn between Styrofoam and cloudstuff. I don't think, given that, that there is any cause for the ponies to complain about the flimsiness of human houses.

11276629
On that note the Hotdog was invented by a german immigrant. At least that is how I heared it.
Lots of foodstuffs that get associated with cultures were not invented there.

Cherry shook her head. “I don’t like it. It’s too high. I’d rather have my hooves on the ground, not up in the air like this.”

She's the complete opposite of Ponyville's OTHER Cherry pony, then!

Haruna didn’t bother to explain how the chopsticks were meant to work. The ponies simply ate out of the styrofoam cartons.

If Bubbles can pull it off, so can Ponies! Follow your dreams!

11276783
That sounds like it might be good, but mostly because of the other ingredients. The one I had with spinach, green peppers, and peas was just bland. Vegan "cheese," too, which absolutely did not help.

11276909
Now that sounds great! Bread+cheese+stuff really adds up to limitless possibilities.

The other great debate in the pizza world (besides pineapple) seems to be whether you eat the crust or not.

11276915
Quesadillas are also an American invention, as are a lot of "Mexican" dishes.

Should clarify what you mean by Chinese Food. Yes a lot of dishes in America."Chinese Restaurants" where invented in San Fan,but there are more Chinese Style American Food.
Not sure Ponies don't have Pizza (they certainly do in G5) though food you need to pick up and eat would have been inverted by Unicorns,or an Equestria species with hands.

11277027
About the quesadilla, do you mean "America" as in "the United States of America?" Because that seems to be wrong, every source I could find points to colonial Mexico with Spanish involvement. And if that's not what you meant by "America," Mexico is part of the North American continent, so is technically American in the same way that Spain or Germany is European.

11276556
*is the kind of mare that leaves the crust after eating a few* >.>

11277044
Yeah, the "American" thing is confusing semantics to foreigners. It's commonly used to refer to US citizens because Usaian is a completely stupid word. Both Mexicans and Canadians use it, and everybody (over here) knows what it means. Technical accuracy doesn't trump popular usage, I'm afraid.

Internet sources... :facehoof: Yeah, it's more complex that that, and nothing springs fully formed from a vacuum, but... I grew up on the border and spent a lot of time in Mexico and watched this all play out in realtime. For a snack, Mexicans would melt some cheese on a tortilla, but there were no toppings, and it wasn't called a quesadilla. "A little cheese" was a description, not a name. At that time "burrito" wasn't in usage either; stuff wrapped completely in a tortilla existed, but it was a called a "burro." It was American (Usaian) restaurants that needed names for menu items that came up with those (or altered them;* the "ee" sound at the end is supposedly cute and/or attractive?) and messed with the original recipes until they were unrecognisable to the people where they originated.

--------------------
* For some years, quesadillas were called "cheese crisps" on menus.

11276629
Love me some nutritional anthropology. I knew about how spaghetti and meat sauce or "Chinese food" like Panda Express originated in America, but now I'm extremely curious what other countries came up with for "American" food.

11277074
I grew up on the border too, in a Hispanic majority town. Love me some nopales.
Might just be a region thing then, like burritos in northern Mexico are called something else in the southern parts as explained to me by a friend who immigrated from Mexico

11277095
Oh man, there are so many great foods in Mexico that we never get up here! (I miss molotes so much.)

Yeah, regional differences probably account for a whole lot of confusion. I only have direct knowledge of western Sonora, and that only in the mid to late 1900's. If I'm remembering correctly, molotes were a traditional Oaxacan dish.

11277074

Also in Spanish we simply call US citizens "estadounidenses". Sounds far better than "Usaians".

11277144
Anything sounds better than Usaians! :rainbowlaugh:

Hmm.. I'm pretty sure I've seen pizza in the show...

An order of Quepapas with blue cheese dipping sauce

...what the heck is a "quepapas"?


11276629

You know, that may not be all that much of an exaggeration. I have heard tale that a lot of foods Americans associate with Chinese restaurants and thereby the Chinese actually had, in reality, originated in America and thereby are technically American inventions (I couldn't give you exact examples off hand though).

Kinda-sorta. Many "American Chinese" dishes did start out as "authentic Chinese" recipes, which the waves of 19th-century Chinese immigrants who came seeking work as miners and railroad workers brought with them and then adapted over time. Initially, they adapted the recipes mainly for themselves, to substitute ingredients which they could get or grow locally if the originals weren't available (or were prohibitively expensive to import) in America; then, as time went on and the Chinese shopkeepers and restauranteurs who had settled into the "chinatown" districts of various towns and cities discovered there was money to be made by attracting non-Chinese patrons to their shops, they further adapted them to cater more to the tastes of the local populations around them.

11276556

Ah to be so wealthy and frivolous you can throw away parts of the pizza. Grow up poor "thrifty" and you'll always eat the crust... and also pick up any toppings that fell off too. Pizza is not a dish to be wasted!

Emtu #46 · 2 weeks ago · · ·

Her hometown had a Chinese restaurant with a cook who had been trained in San Francisco which was where Chinese food had been invented.

Eh, not wholly inaccurate.

11277074
Yeah, that's often how a lot of these supposedly "foreign" foods come about--through a combination of marketing and extensive alteration of an original, but otherwise considered separate, recipe. Sometimes it's from immigrants adapting their native recipes for the locals they now live with, sometimes its just businessmen trying to draw in customers by presenting a dish that seems "foreign," and they're perfectly content to let customers believe as such...even if it's not technically all that true. :trixieshiftleft: It gets especially confusing when the people from said "foreign country" decide they like the dish so much that they adopt it themselves, adding to the illusion that it originated there when it didn't really.

I don't know enough about the quesadilla to say one way or another, but it wouldn't surprise me if it was a combination of both Mexican and American influences that created it.

11277242
It does sort of depend on how you want to define "American." In my case, I'm generally referring to "American" as "created within the nation of the US" and not so much "created by specifically an American person" (although considering the extensive immigration America has had over the years, properly defining an "American person" can get tricky too, from ethnicity perspective).

That said, I do know there are definitely at least some popular Chinese dishes that were wholly American creations in every sense, but I'm not confident enough on which ones to definitively name specifics. Maybe I can find the time to do some research and get back to you on that, but we'll see--it's the summer rush at my place of work, so my spare time is scant.

But honestly, the real point I want taken from my initial comment is that the same phenomenon could totally happen with the ponies, and I really want to see Admiral Biscuit's take on that now. :rainbowlaugh:

11277086
Here's a vid that discusses that very topic:

Same youtuber also does a couple of other videos on the same subject of the phenomenon of "foreign" foods which is where I got some of this myself, so probably worth watching those too.

11276589

Perfect Pizza Parable.

Thank you! :heart:

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