• Member Since 2nd May, 2013
  • offline last seen Yesterday

AShadowOfCygnus


'I am made from the dust of the stars, and the oceans flow in my veins: here I hide in the heart of the city, like a stranger coming out of the rain.'

T
Source

Time is money is perception is image is reality, an infinite train of days stretching away infinitely beyond the limits of Equine ken.

One more day on the train.


A counterpoint and tribute to my friend of many years, Admiral Biscuit.

With great thanks to Luna Farrowe for pre-reading, and, ultimately, another kind of reading altogether.

Chapters (1)
Comments ( 38 )

9561387
Well, that didn't take long. :rainbowlaugh:

9561396
Also, I'm wondering what kind of tribute is this for AB?

9561404
It's a diametric antithesis to his style of slice-of-life. He deals in the little joys and wonders of each passing day; I deal, as it was once put to me, in 'miserable big-pictures'.

9561407
Oh yikes. The contrast in that one seems immeasurable.

I haven't read much of his stuff, but now that you've explained it, I think I acquired night vision goggles :3

9561410
I consider him one of the best authors on the site, and I cannot recommend his work highly enough. :twilightsmile: Give this one a shot, if you're looking for someplace to start.

Perfect capture of mundanity :)

9561419
:heart:

I'd comment more, but I'm running late for work...

Well, you just captured most of society in about 2100 words. A winner is you. :moustache: Honestly feels like Subdivisions, except talking about adult problems rather than teen problems.

T4E

9561727
Some are born to rule the world, to live their fantasies;
But most of us just dream about the things we'd like to be.

9561767
Sadder still to watch it die than never to have known it.
For you the blind who once could see, the bell tolls for thee.

Hell of a thing to read at my desk. Brilliant portrayal of the drudgery that comes even to magical lands.

9561668

I'm running late for work...

Paean or ironic musing? You decide. :derpytongue2: (<3)


9561881

Hell of a thing to read at my desk.

Well, that's either the best place to read this, or the worst. :rainbowlaugh: Still, I'm glad you found it enjoyable -- thank you.


9561882
My pleasure. :twilightsmile:


9562432

You wouldn't believe how hard it makes to find things when that happens

Oh, wouldn't I. xP There are songs I haven't known the name of since childhood, but can still sing verbatim.

9562676

There are songs I haven't known the name of since childhood, but can still sing verbatim.

There are sites that can help. Type in "find songs by lyrics"

Is it odd or wrong that this sheer assault of mundanity is somehow strangely satisfying, even in its bleakness? I have no idea how, but you've twisted slice of life's enjoyment of the simple without losing the fascination of the simple. And so beautifully, critically detached.

I cannot help but admire it, even as I fight against empathizing with it too much.

9563083
I wouldn't consider it odd at all, actually. There's a known and easy comfort in the familiar, the routine -- and you're still getting a vertical slice of something highly familiar, if still in many ways distressing. Kind of the same way we can't help but relate to protagonists in terribad horror, no matter how many awful, life-ending decisions they make. :P

And I, exercising true authorial fiat this one time, am inclined to argue that this is in many ways a horror story.

this is in many ways a horror story.

I agree. And Alice here would agree too:

... So the experts are with you on this one. :raritywink:

I read this story right before a particularly tough day at work, and I'm glad I did because it made me thankful that at my blue-collar job, I at least get my healthy exercise. And I'm thankful to live in a country where blue-collar work isn't stigmatized. And that I'm not stuck in Dilbert Land.

That's another good thing about dark stories: They remind us to count our blessings.

9563749
Always nice to know the company one is keeping. :raritywink:

That's another good thing about dark stories: They remind us to count our blessings.

I keep hoping that'll be the takeaway. 'Yes, it's every bit as bad out there as you think. But, take a look for me and see just how much worse it could be.'

Speaking of which, I promise I'm in receipt of that PM and am working on my response.

boulangerie

I learned a new word!

Boys-work-boys-clothes-weather-boys-work.

derpicdn.net/img/view/2012/7/13/42373.png

accountants play with the boss away, but only just. They’re accountants, after all.

I don’t know any actual accountants, but I assume this to be true.

Can’t wait to never have any of her own, no matter what mother says.

:rainbowlaugh:
I have the same feelings as she does about this subject.

At the end of this, I feel sorry for the protagonist. I really want to give her a hug. :heart:

9579428
For the record, I need to express once again just how thankful I am to you as a friend and fellow writer -- not just for reading and enjoying this, but for being one of the best reasons I have to keep coming back and writing more. I still care about the characters and the subject material, even -- what, six years after the show itself lost my interest? in no small part thanks to you and your continued efforts to bring them to life.

I learned a new word!

Can't get away from the fucking things in France. They're like Starbucks everywhere else, except independently-owned and somehow even less welcoming.

blah-blah-blah-boys-blah

(You had to check, didn't you? ;P) Still, we all know one, don't we? Sometimes it's girls, sometimes it's cars, sometimes it's your manager at the garage thinking he knows jack about anything.

I have the same feelings as she does about this subject.

So say a not-insubstantial portion of us nearing 30. ;P

9580491

For the record, I need to express once again just how thankful I am to you as a friend and fellow writer -- not just for reading and enjoying this, but for being one of the best reasons I have to keep coming back and writing more.

:heart:

I still care about the characters and the subject material, even -- what, six years after the show itself lost my interest? in no small part thanks to you and your continued efforts to bring them to life.

I kinda feel the same--I’m several seasons behind at this point, and generally only watch new episodes as needed for research purposes, but writing about technicolor horses is what I’m apparently good at, so I keep on keeping on.

And Cold in Gardez said that stories about ponies are stories about people, so there’s that.

Can't get away from the fucking things in France. They're like Starbucks everywhere else, except independently-owned and somehow even less welcoming.

Hmm, I haven’t been to France in a good 30 years or so. I think we went in 89? Something like that. Spent most of our time in a small, out-of-the-way village in the south of France. Did get to experience both the TGV and basically a motorized goat track. :rainbowlaugh:

Managed to even buy something on my own--a Majorette (I think that was the brand name) toy bus, which I probably still have somewhere. Lots of pantomime with the shopkeeper, ‘cause he didn’t know English and I didn’t know French.

(You had to check, didn't you? ;P) Still, we all know one, don't we? Sometimes it's girls, sometimes it's cars, sometimes it's your manager at the garage thinking he knows jack about anything.

Dude, about my manager--this hasn’t made it into a blog post yet, but he was going on about a CNN reporter getting fired and then said it was because he exposed how the prime minister of Isreal was trying to kick out all the Jews. I just started laughing so hard.

I think it did make a blog post when he very confidently told me that Sweden was an island.

So say a not-insubstantial portion of us nearing 30. ;P

Nearing thirty, you say? You young kids :rainbowlaugh: I’ll be celebrating 42 at Bronycon this year.

This was superb.

I need to do a blog post reviewing this. Or promoting it, or something. How the hell do you only have 32 followers?

Well, you have 33 now, in any case. You captured something better than I've ever seen it captured before. Well done.

How can such a boring life be so engaging to read?

I got here through GaPJaxie's blog. I'm glad I did.

Comment posted by Ri2 deleted May 17th, 2019

I'm almost inclined to consider this story Slice of Death, as I'm not convinced that any living took place in it. Kind of chilling, honestly.

Thanks I hate it.

Tired phrases aside, excellent story.

PresentPerfect
Author Interviewer

9561407
Oh, yes, this makes perfect sense.

10094659
Ooh, these be dangerous waters ye be treadin', laddie. ;3 HC SVNT DRACONES, and also more stories in the near future.

9561419
I've read "Just Drifting Around" on your recommendation and the comparison of it being the opposite to this piece is surprisingly apt.

My life used to be halfway to "Drifting", but now it bears an uncanny resemblance to "Infinitude". I was contemplating shaking up my life already, but these two stories threw it into sharper relief.

10342336
Thanks for reading, and for the comment. Glad that even at this late stage I can still introduce people to good, quality horsewords of the Admiral Biscuit variety. :twilightsmile:

And yes, there's definitely something to be said for self-awareness of that variety -- knowing the parts we play and the tolls they take on us. Best of luck with your journey, wherever it takes you.

Very interesting story. It captures that feeling of having all your time scheduled and sucked away that comes along sometimes. Never any time to yourself.

9561407

This makes me realize that the two different perspectives have two parts: how abstract/wide their focus is (are all things you experience in life the same, or are they highly particular and different?) and also the value judgement the focus makes (is every day seeming the same a bad thing, or a good thing?). It would be interesting to see two other kinds of fics: one that takes the approach of AB's writing that focuses heavily on how each day and experience is different but adopts the more negative view of this fic and vice versa. And then comparing those two fics to this fic and, say, Just Drifting Around.

So basically, there's four types of fics, and their perspectives are: everything changes and that's good (bad things never last), everything changes and that's bad (good things never last), nothing changes and that's bad (bad things last forever), nothing changes and that's good (good things last forever).

This is a tour de force. Best way to do stream-of-consciousness that I've ever read, I think, at least at this moment. Joyce was too obscure; Woolf too wordy, inconsistent in degree of submersion, and too hard to follow what with switching characters and locations without telling us; Pynchon never said anything significant; and Faulkner just cheated.

Is the style modeled on any author or text?

So many just-right words. How long did this take to write?

I was often lost. Sometimes due to not being British, but sometimes the style is too telegraphic (or metaphoric?) for me to follow.

Washroom. A closet to fit the pejorative.

???

lolloping

I did not know that was a word until now, yet I thought I knew what it meant immediately. (I wasn't quite right, but close enough.)

Choice expletive.

Nice.

Open the icebox, pick through the offerings, dog circling expectantly. Stare, less than she wants to.

She stares less than she wants to stare?

Squat half-timbers sliding past on either side

Is a half-timber a kind of house?

Square-eyed faces, blank and still—round-eyed faces, blanker still.

???

back down in time to dodge the mare-and-two-foal circus.

Nice.

Receptionist wants to make small talk; nod to the door, smile wanly. She understands, no matter how many times this makes, and squeaks out shrill sweetnesses to each retreating back.

That struck me as very sad.

The firm, at a tackle shop’s remove from the firmament

???

a sweetcorn digestive

?

turn-turn-turning like father’s mill, great wings spread wide for the wind.

??? Is this mare a pegasus?

Some question of in-kind foodstuffs as an alternative to the per-acre flat rate.

I went back to try to puzzle out what kind of firm this might be, because I wanted to know if "three bags full" means Carrot Top will give them three bags of carrots instead of the per-acre flat rate. Is it a crop insurance firm? I can't think of any other possibility.

Yes sir, no sir, three bags full sir.

If that's a literal answer to the question, then it's very clever, except for being too clever for me to understand.

Count the minutes as sandwiches fly past the glass-pane case. (Just give her the food, she hasn’t paid for showmareship.)

Is this some kind of barista art they do in England?

The on-again-off-again is leaning against the siding as she comes up the walk

Wow, that's a very concise stream-of-consciousness way of explaining their relationship.

Reminds me of a song from 1968: “Mrs. Chisholm’s Weekend” by Jonathan & Charles:

Chorus:
Oh, what a funny world,
Everything's absurd.
Oh, what a funny world,
That is what I’ve heard.

Mrs. Chisholm Friday afternoon
Picks up wages she’s earned with her broom
Sweeping floors and window sills, to pay her bills,
To pay her bills.

Saturday morning curlers in her hair, spends a half a crown here, a half a crown there,
Buying food and common store,
To wax some more,
To wax some more.

Sunday morning the church bell rings,
Mrs. Chisholm with her whole heart sings,
Then the preacher says “Cheerio”.
Another week to go.
Another week to go.

9562852
9562676
Better, type one line from the song into the Google search box, with quotation marks around it so it searches only for that exact sequence of words.

It took me 30 years to find out that Robyn Hitchcock wrote "My wife and my dead wife". I had to wait for lyrics websites to be invented.

Are the square eyes horse eyes, and the round eyes dog eyes?

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