A Study in Draconequus 78 members · 26 stories
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Bluegrass Brooke
Group Admin

Draconequus are nebulous concepts at best in terms of canon. So, we the authors get the chance to paint our own history and culture of their species. To you fellow members, I ask this. What are some overriding philosophies and theologies present in your headcanon of the draconequus? I'll post my reply to this later, but I'd love to hear your ideas.

5007352
I suppose I get to share some of my drakonakai headcanon, especially since I've been thinking about it a lot lately due to their presence in one of my story series.
I'm still working on the language and their exact location, but beyond that, they live in scattered village tribes in a thick forest or jungle environment.
Now for their beliefs, a triangle is heavily present in many aspects, reaching to their coming of age rites and marriage. The triangle relates to the perfect union between their triune God, Avupiph (also Piph, Adim, or Avupen. Basically the Christian God.) and them. For the son, one or upha is carved onto a triangle necklace with Avupeph (a) at top (I'll posting a pic on DA soon). ONE represents the contributions and loving bond of the father, mother, and God to the child and his upbringing and growth into a mature adult (o-father, n-mother, e-Avupeph). For marriage, the male bestows the upha necklace to his wife as representation of their vows to be in union with each other and Avupeph (husband, wife, God). The friends contribute by removing one of their claws, carving their name, and adding it to the necklace. Lol, the claws grow back. Imagine a poor drakonekuus with ten friends. He'd have a hard life if they didn't grow back.
The eldest son's graduation rites are different than his other sibling (on a rare occasion, the the eldest daughter will receive this honor is there are no sons by the time she is ready). The son must prove his worth to his rather than be the right age. If the father decides he is ready, they will engage in a duel (not to the death. Weapons depend on preference. Generally swords). Even if the son doesn't win, depending on his character and chivalry, he can still receive his rites. His father will give him a sword, heirloom or made by his own hands) or other weapon of choice, and explain the meaning of the different parts-- the pommel or tang =body, the cruciform guard= the soul, and the blade= the mind. Then the mother will bestow him with the Upha and explain the meaning.
If the father is not living, then the rites are passed on the uncle, grandfather, or next oldest son.
Lol, this is probably a confusing info dump.
Anyway, that's some that I have so far.
~Melly~

Bluegrass Brooke
Group Admin

5340988 LOVE it, Melly! I'm blown away with this one. So freakin' good!

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