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#1 · 57w, 6d ago · 1 · ·

Okay fellas. Let me bring you up to speed on things: writing is confusing. There are characters and dialogue and dramatic irony and scene visualization... you get it, the list goes on and on. Even the professionals don't know where to begin. Now that's where I come in. Critics help authors improve and reach out to their readers with brand spanking new stories. Tonight (Friday the 20th of September). I will be answering any and all question coming my way on writing on this forum. Ready? Set! Ask away!

#2 · 57w, 6d ago · · ·

>>1792043

I ask one question and one question alone.

HOW THE FUCK DO I GET RID OF MY NATURAL LAZINESS?!?!?!?!??!??!?!?!:raritydespair::raritydespair::raritydespair::raritydespair::raritydespair:

#4 · 57w, 6d ago · · ·

>>1792043

What do you consider to be the most important aspect of a story on fimfic in terms of attracting new readers?

#5 · 57w, 6d ago · · ·

>>1792043

What do you do when you're at a point in a story where you have a multitude of options to follow, but don't know which one to choose?

#6 · 57w, 6d ago · · ·

>>1792056

You want to tap my OC?

Nigga, u gay?

#7 · 57w, 6d ago · · ·

>>1792052 Great question!

It's definitely one we all struggle with. The first step is to really find what is stopping you. It could be that you're too busy or have some writer's block or even a case of procrastination. Then work from there.

Writer's Block: Every Writer's Worst Fear

Find your inspiration. If it is music, listen to music. If it is art, find art to inspire you. (Of course, I'm speaking from personal experience)

#8 · 57w, 6d ago · · ·

>>1792043

Had a couple more specific crap questions.

1. How do I properly evoke cuteness? I need a young adult character to be puppy tier cute for a fic.

2. Would a cohesive and effective team that can solve most problems with some planning, annoy or scare readers in any way? I can still smell the Mary Sue paranoia up to these days.

#9 · 57w, 6d ago · · ·

>>1792060 Ah! That's tough.

A lot goes into a story but if I had to choose one (just kidding: three): the first ones to come to mind are plot development, characters, and dialogue.

#10 · 57w, 6d ago · · ·

>>1792075

It's just extreme procrastination.:applejackunsure:

#12 · 57w, 6d ago · · ·

>>1792061

Options? You might want to be more specific. Do you mean paths to take when developing plot and characters?

#13 · 57w, 6d ago · · ·

>>1792043

Admujica, how can I be funny? :fluttershysad:

Okay, wait, no. I don't want to be that cruel.

Can you teach me how to write good characters? :fluttershyouch:

Okay, I'll stop now.

>>1792061

Is there an option that leads to a battle involving two nonwinged ponies jumping between two dueling airships on a collision course with Canterlot? If so, choose that one. If not, make one up that leads to that.

#14 · 57w, 6d ago · · ·

>>1792093

I mean plot options. Like character A can do either action X Y or Z and it will slightly alter the story, without actually completely changing the ending.

Like how some video games have different options to choose, which all lead to a different ending, but the story usually still has the same basic shape. (Same enemies, same boss, same levels, just a different ending cutscene)

Since I'm writing a story, I can only choose one path.

#15 · 57w, 6d ago · · ·

>>1792043 How would you go about writing an abused filly? Specifically how would you show she's traumatized without slipping into angst.  

#16 · 57w, 6d ago · · ·

>>1792069 No the OC in that banner. :rainbowlaugh:

>>1792090 :rainbowkiss:

#17 · 57w, 6d ago · · ·

>>1792043

Since it's free advice, I might as well exploit it for all it's worth.

How do you advise is the best way to translate a good idea into a story?

I've had many premises in my head which I consider to be quite good but it's always a different story to progress an idea to a story.

What is your advice in this situation?

#18 · 57w, 6d ago · · ·

>>1792084

1. How do I properly evoke cuteness? I need a young adult character to be puppy tier cute for a fic.

First thing to know is that every reader is not going to be as excited to see Derpy sad when she doesn't get muffins. If the story is already published, you might want to consider seeing what your audience likes and stick with it. Get to know your readers!

Writing wise, use a lot of mood and visualization to paint "adorable" all of that scene. Don't go overboard (because that could upset the exposition's balance), but just let the reader know that this is suppose to be cute as hell.

2. Would a cohesive and effective team that can solve most problems with some planning, annoy or scare readers in any way? I can still smell the Mary Sue paranoia up to these days.

You see: that's the problem. Characters don't need to be deep but need to have two elements: a.)diversity: every character is unique and a character is not 100% of one trait and b.) responsive: make sure the character is affect on an emotional level by events and other characters.

#19 · 57w, 6d ago · · ·

>>1792133

Then why'd you reply to me as well?

#20 · 57w, 6d ago · · ·

>>1792117

Well, the story I'm writing currently is a Bioshock crossover, so maybe I might just do that.

#21 · 57w, 6d ago · · ·

>>1792117

Admujica, how can I be funny?

Let me tell you something about myself: If I were to do stand up comedy, the audience would boo me off the stage before a word comes out of my mouth. So not much there... However, from personal experience, be yourself; that's when people can really enjoy you and your humor.

Can you teach me how to write good characters?

Characters tough and require much more thought than a four hour Q&A session, but the best advice I can give is here:

Characters don't need to be deep but need to have two elements: a.)diversity: every character is unique and a character is not 100% of one trait and b.) responsive: make sure the character is affect on an emotional level by events and other characters.

#22 · 57w, 6d ago · · ·

>>1792146

:yay:

Make sure to mention me when the Features roll in.

More seriously though, which way lets you to best show the aspects of the the character or setting you want to get across? Not all of them will be equal on that front.

If you wanted to make a point about your character's persistence, one option is likely better than the others. If you wanted to show how horrible the main villain is, surely one of those choices would be more natural for that?

You really just need to decide what points you want to make, what themes you want to express, and really, what story you want to tell.

#23 · 57w, 6d ago · · ·

>>1792164

Well played, Admujica. :trixieshiftright:

You win this round.

#24 · 57w, 6d ago · · ·

>>1792119 I see now. I'm not an avid gamer but I'm glad you brought that up:

I'm sure in the RPG video game industry they do something every writer should try at one point. They sit down while writing the script and consider a very simple school of thought: cause and effect. Layout your consequences, find the best way to carry it out and do it.  

#25 · 57w, 6d ago · · ·

>>1792184 :rainbowlaugh:

From what I've heard, you give out some pretty good writing tips. If you don't mind, I would love for you to stick around and help me out. :raritywink:

#26 · 57w, 6d ago · · ·

>>1792136

First thing to know is that every reader is not going to be as excited to see Derpy sad when she doesn't get muffins.

Ugh, don't remind me. I'm sick of Derpy.

If the story is already published, you might want to consider seeing what your audience likes and stick with it. Get to know you're readers!

Basically, find a voice and apply it to this particular purpose.

Writing wise, use a lot of mood and visualization to paint "adorable" all of that scene. Don't go overboard (because that could upset the exposition's balance), but just let the reader know that this is suppose to be cute as hell.

Got it.

Characters don't need to be deep but need to have two elements: a.)diversity: every character is unique and a character is not 100% of one trait and b.) responsive: make sure the character is affect on an emotional level by events and other characters.

wow, I have that covered.:twilightblush:

I'm such an idiot.

Thanks, admujica.

#27 · 57w, 6d ago · · ·

>>1792184

>>1792196

Thanks, you two answered my questions!

I have no further query

#28 · 57w, 6d ago · · ·

>>1792126 Hmmm....

You see, many people like to put a past trauma behind a character but forget to really put it behind a character. Make sure he/she is truly effected by it. Don't make it the center of their universe, but make it noticeable the character is struggling to get over it. Let it effect her/his decisions and reactions but never mind it blatantly obvious either.

#29 · 57w, 6d ago · · ·

>>1792233 No problem! You are welcome to come back if you need anything else and, if you don't mind, please spread the word! :twilightsmile:

#30 · 57w, 6d ago · · ·

>>1792213

For as long as I'm up, sure.:twilightsmile:

I never exactly turn down a chance to blather at people. Especially with other reviewer-types.

#31 · 57w, 6d ago · · ·

>>1792215 Glad I was able to help out! If you don't mind, I would appreciate it if you help me out by spreading the word: I have two more hours of Pandora Radio and answering questions to fill!

#32 · 57w, 6d ago · · ·

>>1792267

How could I do it, though?

#33 · 57w, 6d ago · · ·

>>1792275

Do you own a megaphone and a roof, real-life-wise? :duck:

#34 · 57w, 6d ago · · ·

>>1792275 However you're comfortable! Half of FiM Fiction is a social networking site so it's up to you! Thanks!

#35 · 57w, 6d ago · · ·

>>1792242 That'll do, thanks for answering :twilightsmile:

#36 · 57w, 6d ago · · ·

>>1792275 ... there are also other schools of thought *Cough cough* Luminary *Cough cough*

#37 · 57w, 6d ago · · ·

>>1792298 No problem! I'll be here for another two hours! :yay:

#38 · 57w, 6d ago · · ·

>>1792262

Awesome! I was actually going to ask but my day went school > late buses > rain > "groan" > sleep > Jesus! I'M LATE FOR THE Q&A THING!

#39 · 57w, 6d ago · · ·

>>1792126

Oh, hey, missed your thing.

Okay, a more serious take on the topic this time, from the thread earlier.

Be subtle about it. It becomes incredibly obvious when an author is trying to hard to be emotionally manipulative, and playing for the 'feels'. You're right to avoid the angstiness too. You'll earn more sympathy for it being a kid than you would with an adult, sure, but not even a kid is immune to the fact that misery just isn't engaging. Nobody is going to like, or get attached to a character that starts off depressing.

Before you reveal the horrible things that happened, make sure that we actually like the character, or we won't care that bad things happen to her. But do hint at it on the way. Have the character shy away from contact maybe, or have her get uncomfortable when someone gets behind her, or have her assume the worst of people's intentions.

#40 · 57w, 6d ago · · ·

>>1792297

I suck at social networking.

I didn't even knew that this site had social networking features.:facehoof:

One more question if you don't mind.:twilightblush:

I was talking to a friend yesterday about those times when during a story an incredibly effective method to solve problems is introduced and for some reason never done again. That one image with advice from Pixar says that you should come up with different ways to solve problems but at times it just doesn't seem reasonable to go fight a monster head-on when you had a muffled sniping bazooka introduced on the last chapter.

Is this really an encouraged practice on fiction to keep readers surprised and interested or just some authors forgetting everything after it loses its first moment of relevance?

And, should a really practical method be re-used as long as it's the most logical thing to do or it's better to try to throw it away for novelty's sake?

#41 · 57w, 6d ago · · ·

>>1792345

And, should a really practical method be re-used as long as it's the most logical thing to do or it's better to try to throw it away for novelty's sake?

FiM has had four major villains.

Two of them were stopped by the holy superweapon, and both times it was used, it required some quest or trial to use. One time it was actually hinted that it would be used, in the Canterlot Wedding, but it ended up not being the case.

And heck, in Magic Duel, the writers tried their best to make us think the EoH was the solution, but it ended up not being that at all.

Why do they do all that? Well, because having the giant, unstoppable solution, the 'I win button' to every problem is boring. Yet, don't actually pretend it doesn't exist. The Elements of Harmony is vital to the plot in other ways, and we never forget they're there.

In the same way, try to find reasons for the heroes not to use the same answer to every problem, but do acknowledge it.

#42 · 57w, 6d ago · · ·

>>1792345

To be honest, a "one size fits all" solution should never be introduced. For one reason: the next issue is easily resolved and if you don't use it, the reader will ask "Well, why the hell didn't use the ultimate weapon thingy?"

In other words, if you want to stay away from things that halt the development of your story.

#43 · 57w, 6d ago · 1 · ·

>>1792043 Within the first 500 words, what turns you off the most? Also, what draws you in the most?

#44 · 57w, 6d ago · · ·

>>1792335Excellent points. I'll need to do a bit of tinkering, seeing as audience already knows she's been abused, but I have yet to show the extent.

#45 · 57w, 6d ago · · ·

>>1792394

Butting in, go!

If the first five hundred words are a shameless exposition dump, instant fail.

That, or really bad punctuation and grammar.

I'm a cheap date. I love an attention grabbing line of dialogue at the start, a particularly intriguing opening statement, or finding ourselves in a mysterious, or otherwise unusual situation.

#46 · 57w, 6d ago · · ·

>>1792417

I've seen a lot of stories totally bomb for just front-loading their pain and suffering, and never giving us a chance to actually want to empathize with the character.

I'm not saying the abuse has to be secret. Just hold off on really beating us over the head with the misery for a little while. Until we're hooked and invested.

#47 · 57w, 6d ago · · ·

>>1792394

First 500 words: is one of the most important parts of a story. It's the exposition! It's the dough of the story to the reader.

What turns me off the most: When a writer makes me swallow the massive pill marked "HISTORY LESSON." The author is introducing a whole new world to me and he just threw an amazing opportunity away by simply telling me the back story. :raritydespair:

What draw me in the most: When a writer shows me a new character that feels well built and knows his motor. I just love that. It shows that the author has planned his story, knows his characters and where he is going to take them.  :raritystarry:

#48 · 57w, 6d ago · · ·

>>1792418  For me it's a weather report or passive voice. Also explaining the characters or setting like I have never before heard of MLP.

I do love a good riddle. If I'm curious about something I'll keep reading.

#49 · 57w, 6d ago · · ·

>>1792056 Taken... but for $25.... :rainbowwild:

#50 · 57w, 6d ago · · ·

>>1792426 That's what the original story was, just a short stab to the feels. After writing though, I sat back and realized that I had a concept I hadn't seen before.

A (semi)original idea:pinkiegasp:

So I decided to continue the story, however I left myself starting after the "big feels dump". Hence me asking for help, the thing got popular and I'm so afraid of failing all of those who faved it.

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